Faculty Scholarship

A Showcase of Liberal Arts Faculty Books and Creative Activity

Scholarship in the College of Liberal Arts

The faculty in the College of Liberal Arts aren't just excellent teachers, they're prolific scholars. Use the Search bars below to find specific content, authors, or departments from faculty across the College.

Books are listed by most recent published date.

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College of Liberal Arts Faculty Books

Academic Unit / Department

Subject

Type

  • Karrin Anderson

    2018

    Women Feminism and Pop Politics: From “Bitch” to “Badass” and Beyond

    Gender and SexualityPoliticsRhetoric Publications

    Women, Feminism, and Pop Politics: From "Bitch" to "Badass" and Beyond examines the negotiation of feminist politics and gendered political leadership in twenty-first century U.S. popular culture. In a wide-ranging survey of texts―which includes memes and digital discourses, embodied feminist performances, parody and infotainment, and televisual comedy and drama―contributing authors assess the ways in which popular culture discourses both reveal and reshape citizens’ understanding of feminist politics and female political figures. Two archetypes of female identity figure prominently in its analysis. "Bitch" is a frame that reflects the twentieth-century anxiety about powerful women as threatening and unfeminine, trapping political women within the double bind between femininity and competence. "Badass" recognizes women’s capacity to lead but does so in a way that deflects attention away from the persistence of sexist stereotyping and cultural misogyny. Additionally, as depictions of political women become increasingly complex and varied, fictional characters and actual women are beginning to move beyond the bitch and badass frames, fashioning collaborative and comic modes of leadership suited to the new global milieu. This book will be of interest to students and scholars interested in communication, U.S. political culture, gender and leadership, and women in media.

  • K. Dawn Grapes

    2018

    With Mornefull Musique: Funeral Elegies in Early Modern England

    Music/Music History Publications

    This book looks at the musical culture of death in early modern England. In particular, it examines musical funeral elegies and the people related to commemorative tribute - the departed, the composer, potential patrons, and friends and family of the deceased - to determine the place these musical-poetic texts held in a society in which issues of death were discussed regularly, producing a constant, pervasive shadow over everyday life. The composition of these songs reached a peak at the end of the sixteenth and the beginning of the seventeenth centuries. Thomas Weelkes and Thomas Morley both composed musical elegies, as did William Byrd, Thomas Campion, John Coprario, and many others. Like the literary genre from which these musical gems emerged, there was wide variety in form, style, length, and vocabulary used. Embedded within them are clear messages regarding the social expectations, patronage traditions, and class hierarchy of late Elizabethan and early Jacobean England. En masse, they offer a glimpse into the complex relationship that existed between those who died, those who grieved, and attitudes toward both death and life.

  • Susan Opp

    2018

    Performance Measurement in Local Sustainability Policy

    Sustainability StudiesUrban Studies Publications

    Local officials are responsible for a number of important tasks that have a significant impact on the quality of life of most Americans. Arguably, the policy choices made by local governments in the United States more directly impact individual well-being than do the choices made at any other level of government. From zoning decisions to the creation of parks and the maintenance of sidewalks and trails, local governments are largely responsible for direct services to the public and can provide the necessary tools and skills to create an attractive and vibrant community. And yet one area of significant importance for both individuals and for the country as a whole, local sustainability, is a relatively new policy area for many American municipalities. For example, how many local governments are adopting sustainability policies and plans? How are those initiatives performing? Without an honest and robust examination of both the effectiveness and the efficiency of local sustainability policies, the success of the entire sustainability movement in the United States is uncertain. This book provides readers with a comprehensive understanding of what constitutes local sustainability and why it matters.

  • Andrew Knight

    2018

    Music therapy: An introduction to the profession

    Music Therapy Publications

    Music Therapy: An Introduction to the Profession is a textbook designed to help future music therapists look forward into the many avenues that are possible in their careers. The first section of the book looks at several aspects of the profession, including the history and profession of music therapy, clinical research, a neuroscience understanding of music for clinicians, and how to develop the musical skills needed to successfully engage with a variety of clientele. The second part of the book explores populations, diagnoses, and special needs that music therapists might encounter. The editors have put together an internationally-renowned group of authors with decades of experiences working and researching with these populations, many of whom are published authors of journal articles and books in their own right. Additionally, the book has a companion website at www.introtomusictherapy.com that provides a wealth of supplementary material including links, podcasts, pdfs, and videos from the authors of each chapter. Students and instructors are encouraged to use this resource to learn more about the profession in different ways. The website will also keep up-to-date as new research and resources are published as the profession of music therapy is also continuously evolving.

  • Nick Marx

    2018

    The Comedy Studies Reader

    Film StudiesMedia StudiesRace/Ethnicity Publications

    From classical Hollywood film comedies to sitcoms, recent political satire, and the developing world of online comedy culture, comedy has been a mainstay of the American media landscape for decades. Recognizing that scholars and students need an authoritative collection of comedy studies that gathers both foundational and cutting-edge work, Nick Marx and Matt Sienkiewicz have assembled The Comedy Studies Reader. This anthology brings together classic articles, more recent works, and original essays that consider a variety of themes and approaches for studying comedic media—the carnivalesque, comedy mechanics and absurdity, psychoanalysis, irony, genre, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and nation and globalization. The authors range from iconic theorists, such as Mikhail Bakhtin, Sigmund Freud, and Linda Hutcheon, to the leading senior and emerging scholars of today. As a whole, the volume traces two parallel trends in the evolution of the field—first, comedy’s development into myriad subgenres, formats, and discourses, a tendency that has led many popular commentators to characterize the present as a “comedy zeitgeist”; and second, comedy studies’ new focus on the ways in which comedy increasingly circulates in “serious” discursive realms, including politics, economics, race, gender, and cultural power.

  • Joshua Sbicca

    2018

    Food Justice Now!: Deepening the Roots of Social Struggle

    Food and AgricultureSocial JusticeSocial Movements Publications

    The United States is a nation of foodies and food activists, many of them progressives, and yet their overwhelming concern for what they consume often hinders their engagement with social justice more broadly. Food Justice Now! charts a path from food activism to social justice activism that integrates the two. It calls on the food-focused to broaden and deepen their commitment to the struggle against structural inequalities both within and beyond the food system. In an engrossing, historically grounded, and ethnographically rich narrative, Joshua Sbicca argues that food justice is more than just a myopic focus on food, allowing scholars and activists alike to investigate the causes behind inequities and evaluate and implement political strategies to overcome them. Focusing on carceral, labor, and immigration crises, Sbicca tells the stories of three California-based food movement organizations, showing that when activists use food to confront neoliberal capitalism and institutional racism, they can creatively expand how to practice and achieve food justice. Sbicca sets his central argument in opposition to apolitical and individual solutions, discussing national food movement campaigns and the need for economically and racially just food policies—a matter of vital public concern with deep implications for building collective power across a diversity of interests.

  • Pete Taylor

    2018

    Water Crises and Governance: Reinventing Collaborative Institutions in an Era of Uncertainty

    EnvironmentSustainability StudiesWater Publications

    Water Crises and Governance critically examines the relationship between water crises and governance in the face of challenges to provide water for growing human demand and environmental needs. Water crises threaten the assumptions and accepted management practices of water users, managers and policymakers. In developed and developing world contexts from North America and Australasia, to Latin America, Africa and China, existing institutions and governance arrangements have unintentionally provoked water crises while shaping diverse, often innovative responses to management dilemmas. This volume brings together original field-based studies by social scientists investigating water crises and their implications for governance.

  • Matthew Cooperman & Aby Kaupang

    2018

    NOS (disorder, not otherwise specified)

    Disability StudiesMarriage and Family StudiesPoetry Publications

    "In their compelling and moving collaboration, Aby Kaupang and Matthew Cooperman chronicle the challenges and occasional triumphs of raising a child with autism. The three letters of the book’s title, NOS, embody the reduction—the negation—of individuals and bodies to medical and psychoanalytic acronyms. The poets realize, however, that the designation of autism to describe their daughter is only a placeholder for a disorder “Not Otherwise Specified,” one which impels them into the vagaries of evaluation, diagnosis, and intervention. Nor does the designation describe the affective challenges of dealing with behavioral anomalies, silences, screaming fits, sleeplessness and trauma. At its core, the work celebrates a child’s life, however difficult, in passages that testify to the family’s resilience. Its rich formal complexity combines lyrical testimony with documentary objectivity. NOS is a vital contribution to disability poetics but also to a critical poetics of embodiment. It is a remarkable book." —Michael Davidson

  • Sasha Steensen

    2017

    Gatherest

    Poetry Publications

    Gatherest defiantly attests to intimacy and our binding humanness amidst an alienating present. In three elegant poems, brushes with contemporary violence are met with meditations on kinship and communication alongside coursing reflections on the elemental foundations that borne and ground our existence. “Daughter,” she addresses, “people are not bad / not evil / people want to be like water / and go where currents send them.” Both candid and hopeful, Steensen stares down modern anxieties, embraces vulnerability and presents empathy as an antidote to pervasive chaos.

  • Bruce Ronda

    2017

    The Fate of Transcendentalism. Secularity, Materiality, and Human Flourishing

    Environmental PhilosophyMethodsSocial Movements Publications

    What connected the writers, thinkers, and social reformers who belonged to the American transcendentalist movement of the 1830s-50s? Despite their use of religious language, the answer is a thoroughly secular world view. For most of these figures, human flourishing was the goal of all human culture. A similar goal pervades their twentieth and twenty-first century heirs. For a few transcendentalists like Thoreau, however, even human flourishing was not enough. For him and for his followers like Annie Dillard, transcendental "flourishing" must include the entire cosmos, the more-than human, material world.

  • Lee Anne Peck

    2017

    Media Ethics at Work: True Stories from Young Professionals

    EthicsMedia Studies Publications

    Second Edition! This book was created for used in Media Ethics courses but also as a supplement in other journalism courses. It engages students with true stories of young professionals working in today's multimedia news and strategic communications organizations, helping readers create meaningful connections with real-world applications. By creating a personalized experience for students beginning their first media job or internship, this book helps readers develop their own ethical standards and apply them in the workplace.

  • Todd Mitchell

    2017

    The Last Panther

    Animal RightsEnvironmentFiction Publications

    A 2018 Colorado Book Award Winner, CAL Book Award Winner, and Green Earth Honor Book Award Winner! When eleven-year-old Kiri helps her scientist father capture the last known wild panther, her life in her Florida swamp becomes threatened by poachers, and she must embark on a dangerous journey to save both the panther and herself. Giant sea turtles, climate refugees, and mystical encounters with the Shadow that Hunts populate this fast-paced, heart-pounding tale. (For ages 9 & up.) "A powerful tale." —KIRKUS "Told in vivid, heartbreaking detail and filled with strong, developed characters ...tackles an important theme in a compelling way." —BOOKLIST "Difficult to put down. An important addition on a timely subject." —SLJ "Earnest, heartfelt, and passionate, this book will likely inspire new environmentalists." —Bulletin

  • Dan Beachy-Quick

    2017

    Of Silence and Song

    Creative NonfictionPoetry Publications

    From the back of the book: Midway through the journey of his life, Dan Beachy-Quick found himself without a path, unsure how to live well. Of Silence and Song follows him on his resulting classical search for meaning in the world and in his particular, quiet life. In essays, fragments, marginalia, images, travel writing, and poetry, Beachy-Quick traces his relationships and identities. As father and husband. As teacher and student. As citizen and scholar. And as poet and reader, wondering at the potential and limits of literature. Of Silence and Song finds its inferno―and its paradise―in moments both historically vast and nakedly intimate. Hell: disappearing bees, James Eagan Holmes, Columbine, and the persistent, unforgivable crime of slavery. And redemption: in the art of Marcel Duchamp, the pressed flowers in Emily Dickinson’s Bible, and long walks with his youngest daughter. Curious, earnest, and masterful, Of Silence and Song is an unforgettable exploration of the human soul.

  • Michael Carolan

    2017

    No One Eats Alone: Food as a Social Enterprise

    Community/International DevelopmentFood and AgricultureHealth Publications

    In today’s fast-paced, fast food world, everyone seems to be eating alone, all the time—whether it’s at their desks or in the car. Even those who find time for a family meal are cut off from the people who grew, harvested, distributed, marketed, and sold the foods on their table. Few ever break bread with anyone outside their own socioeconomic group. So why does Michael Carolan say that that no one eats alone? Because all of us are affected by the other people in our vast foodscape. We can no longer afford to ignore these human connections as we struggle with dire problems like hunger, obesity, toxic pesticides, antibiotic resistance, depressed rural economies, and low-wage labor. Carolan argues that building community is the key to healthy, equitable, and sustainable food. While researching No One Eats Alone, he interviewed more than 250 individuals, from flavorists to Fortune 500 executives, politicians to feedlot managers, low-income families to crop scientists, who play a role in the life of food. Advertising consultants told him of efforts to distance eaters and producers—most food firms don’t want their customers thinking about farm laborers or the people living downstream of processing plants. But he also found stories of people getting together to change their relationship to food and to each other. There are community farms where suburban moms and immigrant families work side by side, reducing social distance as much as food miles. There are entrepreneurs with little capital or credit who are setting up online exchanges to share kitchen space, upending conventional notions of the economy of scale. There are parents and school board members who are working together to improve cafeteria food rather than relying on soda taxes to combat childhood obesity. Carolan contends that real change only happens when we start acting like citizens first and consumers second. No One Eats Alone is a book about becoming better food citizens.

  • Thomas Dunn

    2016

    Queerly Remembered: Rhetorics for Representing the GLBTQ Past

    CommunicationsGender and SexualityRhetoric Publications

    Recognized as the 2018 Book of the Year by the National Communication Association (NCA) GLBT Communication Studies Division, Queerly Remembered investigates the ways in which gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer (GLBTQ) individuals and communities have increasingly turned to public tellings of their ostensibly shared pasts in order to advocate for political, social, and cultural change in the present. Much like nations, institutions, and other minority groups before them, GLBTQ people have found communicating their past(s)—particularly as expressed through the concept of memory—a rich resource for leveraging historical and contemporary opinions toward their cause. Drawing from the interdisciplinary fields of rhetorical studies, memory studies, gay and lesbian studies, and queer theory, Thomas R. Dunn considers both the ephemeral tactics and monumental strategies that GLBTQ communities have used to effect their queer persuasion. More broadly this volume addresses the challenges and opportunities posed by embracing historical representations of GLBTQ individuals and communities as a political strategy. Particularly for a diverse community whose past is marked by the traumas of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, the forgetting and destruction of GLBTQ history, and the sometimes-divisive representational politics of fluid, intersectional identities, portraying a shared past is an exercise fraught with conflict despite its potential rewards. Nonetheless, by investigating rich rhetorical case studies through time and across diverse artifacts—including monuments, memorials, statues, media publications, gravestones, and textbooks—Queerly Remembered reveals that our current queer "turn toward memory" is a complex, enduring, and avowedly rich rhetorical undertaking.

  • Zachary Hutchins

    2016
    PoetryPoliticsRace/Ethnicity Publications

    “The volume ably demonstrates that the new “American” nationality was, to a large degree, fictitious, as it excluded women, non-Europeans and members of the lower classes.”—H-Net: Humanities and Social Sciences Review An important reconsideration of the Stamp Act as prelude to the American Revolution The first book-length study of the Stamp Act in decades, this timely collection draws together essays from a broad range of disciplines to provide a thoroughly original investigation of the influence of 1760s British tax legislation on colonial culture, and vice versa. While earlier scholarship has largely focused on the political origins and legacy of the Stamp Act, this volume illuminates the social and cultural impact of a legislative crisis that would end in revolution. Importantly, these essays question the traditional nationalist narrative of Stamp Act scholarship, offering a variety of counter identities and perspectives. Community without Consent recovers the stories of individuals often ignored or overlooked in existing scholarship, including women, Native Americans, and enslaved African Americans, by drawing on sources unavailable to or unexamined by earlier researchers.

  • Leif Sorensen

    2016

    Ethnic Modernism and the Making of US Literary Multiculturalism

    FictionRace/Ethnicity Publications

    Ethnic Modernism and the Making of U.S. Multiculturalism offers a new history of the emergence of multiethnic literature in the United States in which ethnic literary modernists of the 1930s play a crucial role. Focusing on the remarkable careers of four ethnic fiction writers of the 1930s (Younghill Kang, D’Arcy McNickle, Zora Neale Hurston, and Américo Paredes) Sorensen presents a new view of the history of multicultural literature in the U.S. The first part of the book situates these authors within the modernist era to provide an alternative, multicultural vision of American modernism. The second part examines the complex reception histories of these authors’ works, showing how they have been claimed or rejected as ancestors for contemporary multiethnic writing. Combining the approaches of the new modernist studies and ethnic studies, the book presents a new model of twentieth century American literary history.

  • David McIvor

    2016

    Mourning in America: Race and the Politics of Loss

    PoliticsRace/EthnicitySocial Movements Publications

    Recent years have brought public mourning to the heart of American politics, as exemplified by the spread and power of the Black Lives Matter movement, which has gained force through its identification of pervasive social injustices with individual losses. The deaths of Sandra Bland, Michael Brown, Freddie Gray, Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, Walter Scott, and so many others have brought private grief into the public sphere. The rhetoric and iconography of mourning has been noteworthy in Black Lives Matter protests, but David W. McIvor believes that we have paid too little attention to the nature of social mourning—its relationship to private grief, its practices, and its pathologies and democratic possibilities.In Mourning in America, McIvor addresses significant and urgent questions about how citizens can mourn traumatic events and enduring injustices in their communities. McIvor offers a framework for analyzing the politics of mourning, drawing from psychoanalysis, Greek tragedy, and scholarly discourses on truth and reconciliation. Mourning in America connects these literatures to ongoing activism surrounding racial injustice, and it contextualizes Black Lives Matter in the broader politics of grief and recognition. McIvor also examines recent, grassroots-organized truth and reconciliation processes such as the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission (2004–2006), which provided a public examination of the Greensboro Massacre of 1979—a deadly incident involving local members of the Communist Workers Party and the Ku Klux Klan.

  • Joanna Doxey

    2016

    Plainspeak, WY

    EnvironmentPoetry Publications

    Residing in the brutally harsh winters of the Wyoming landscape, Plainspeak, WY is a rumination on self as wilderness. A book of juxtapositions, Doxey leans on the glacial with its inherited dirges and ostensible timelessness, contrasting stoic rock with lamenting body. Ultimately, it is a book of recollection, of broken hearts, and slowly changing landscapes.

  • Bernard Rollin

    2016

    A New Basis for Animal Ethics: Telos and Common Sense

    Animal RightsPhilosophy Publications

    This book, by the author of the second work to appear on animal ethics in the US, amplifies and deepens the basic concepts in the first book. The author shows how animal ethics follows logically from the concept of Telos (animal psychological and physical nature), common sense, and societal ethics for humans.

  • Ann Little

    2016

    The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright

    EnvironmentGender and SexualityRace/Ethnicity Publications

    Esther Wheelwright (1696-1780) embodies the imperial conquest of North America like no other eighteenth-century figure: born and raised to age seven in a New England garrison town, she was taken in wartime by the Wabanaki in 1703 and taught to pray as a Catholic and to live like a native girl. At age twelve, she was enrolled in the Ursuline convent school as a student, where she would remain for the rest of her life as a choir nun, eventually becoming the first and only foreign-born Mother Superior of the order. Hers was an utterly exceptional life, not just because she lived in all three major North American cultures in the colonial northeast. Her progress from Puritan girlhood to Wabanaki Catholicism and survivor of wartime trauma to become the head of a very status-conscious Catholic women’s community is exceptional and inspirational. But because she ended up on the losing French side of the Seven Years’ War, her story has largely been forgotten by English-speaking U.S. Americans and Canadians. Combining the insights of ethnohistory, environmental history, and material culture, Ann Little follows Esther Wheelwright on her many border-crossings. Through Esther’s life, she reveals the hidden histories of the different communities of New England, Wabanaki, and French Canadian women. Their labor and prayers tell a story of the volatile northeastern borderlands like no other.

  • Kelly Bradbury

    2016
    RhetoricTeaching/Pedagogy Publications

    The image of the lazy, media-obsessed American, preoccupied with vanity and consumerism, permeates popular culture and fuels critiques of American education. In Reimagining Popular Notions of American Intellectualism, Kelly Susan Bradbury challenges this image by examining and reimagining widespread conceptions of intellectualism that assume intellectual activity is situated solely in elite institutions of higher education. Bradbury begins by tracing the origins and evolution of the narrow views of intellectualism that are common in the United States today. Then, applying a more inclusive and egalitarian definition of intellectualism, she examines the literacy and learning practices of three nonelite sites of adult public education in the United States: the nineteenth-century lyceum, a twentieth-century labor college, and a twenty-first-century GED writing workshop. Bradbury argues that together these three case studies teach us much about literacy, learning, and intellectualism in the United States over time and place. She concludes the book with a reflection on her own efforts to aid students in recognizing and resisting the rhetoric of anti-intellectualism that surrounds them and that influences their attitudes and actions. Drawing on case studies as well as Bradbury’s own experiences with students, Reimagining Popular Notions of American Intellectualism demonstrates that Americans have engaged and do engage in the process and exercise of intellectual inquiry, contrary to what many people believe. Addressing a topic often overlooked by rhetoric, composition, and literacy studies scholars, it offers methods for helping students reimagine what it means to be intellectual in the twenty-first century.

  • Matthew Cooperman

    2016

    Spool

    Poetry Publications

    "Spool's a year 'written in threes'—its three word lines forming narrow columns or perhaps threads. 'Thread' is a word Cooperman explicitly associates with the lyric here and it is also Ariadne's thread of rescue or at least return though, at times, 'the tape is/broken now so / sick and slck.' To change up the metaphor, as this poem does, Spool is a hive of words continuously active and also continuously threatened with a sort of colony collapse. Written in conversation with past greats such as Shakespeare, Milton, Hopkins, Spool is a way of inhabiting our present."—RAE ARMANTROUT http://sugarhousereviews.blogspot.com

  • Stephanie Malin

    2015

    Stephanie Malin

    EnergyEnvironmentSocial Justice Publications

    Rising fossil fuel prices and concerns about greenhouse gas emissions are fostering a nuclear power renaissance and a revitalized uranium mining industry across the American West. In The Price of Nuclear Power, environmental sociologist Stephanie Malin offers an on-the-ground portrait of several uranium communities caught between the harmful legacy of previous mining booms and the potential promise of new economic development. Using this context, she examines how shifting notions of environmental justice inspire divergent views about nuclear power’s sustainability and equally divisive forms of social activism. Drawing on extensive fieldwork conducted in rural isolated towns such as Monticello, Utah, and Nucla and Naturita, Colorado, as well as in upscale communities like Telluride, Colorado, and incorporating interviews with community leaders, environmental activists, radiation regulators, and mining executives, Malin uncovers a fundamental paradox of the nuclear renaissance: the communities most hurt by uranium’s legacy—such as high rates of cancers, respiratory ailments, and reproductive disorders—were actually quick to support industry renewal. She shows that many impoverished communities support mining not only because of the employment opportunities, but also out of a personal identification with uranium, a sense of patriotism, and new notions of environmentalism. But other communities, such as Telluride, have become sites of resistance, skeptical of industry and government promises of safe mining, fearing that regulatory enforcement won’t be strong enough. Indeed, Malin shows that the nuclear renaissance has exacerbated social divisions across the Colorado Plateau, threatening social cohesion. Malin further illustrates ways in which renewed uranium production is not a socially sustainable form of energy development for rural communities, as it is utterly dependent on unstable global markets. The Price of Nuclear Power is an insightful portrait of the local impact of the nuclear renaissance and the social and environmental tensions inherent in the rebirth of uranium mining.

  • Leisl Carr Childers

    2015

    The Size of the Risk: Histories of Multiple Use in the Great Basin

    EnvironmentGovernment Publications

    The Great Basin, a stark and beautiful desert filled with sagebrush seas and mountain ranges, is ground zero for public lands conflicts. Arising out of the multiple, often incompatible uses created throughout the twentieth century, these struggles reveal the tension inherent within the multiple use concept, a management philosophy that promises equitable access to the region’s resources and economic gain to those who live there. Multiple use was originally conceived as a way to legitimize the historical use of public lands for grazing without precluding future uses, such as outdoor recreation, weapons development, and wildlife management. It was applied to the Great Basin to bring the region, once seen as worthless, into the national economic fold. Land managers, ranchers, mining interests, wilderness and wildlife advocates, outdoor recreationists, and even the military adopted this ideology to accommodate, promote, and sanction a multitude of activities on public lands, particularly those overseen by the Bureau of Land Management. Some of these uses are locally driven and others are nationally mandated, but all have exacted a cost from the region’s human and natural environment. In The Size of the Risk, Leisl Carr Childers shows how different constituencies worked to fill the presumed “empty space” of the Great Basin with a variety of land-use regimes that overlapped, conflicted, and ultimately harmed the environment and the people who depended on the region for their livelihoods. She looks at the conflicts that arose from the intersection of an ever-increasing number of activities, such as nuclear testing and wild horse preservation, and how Great Basin residents have navigated these conflicts. Carr Childers’s study of multiple use in the Great Basin highlights the complex interplay between the state, society, and the environment, allowing us to better understand the ongoing reality of living in the American West. In 2016, the Size of the Risk won the Wester Writers of America Spur Award for Contemporary Nonfiction.

  • Laura Raynolds

    2015

    Handbook of Research on Fair Trade

    Community/International DevelopmentFood and AgricultureSocial Justice Publications

    Fair trade critiques the historical inequalities inherent in international trade and seeks to promote social justice by creating alternative networks linking marginalized producers typically in the global South with progressive consumers typically in the global North. This unique and wide-ranging Handbook analyses key topics in fair trade, illuminating major theoretical and empirical issues, assessing existing research, evaluating central debates and identifying critical unanswered questions. The Handbook of Research on Fair Trade edited by Laura Raynolds, CSU Sociology Professor and Director of the Center for Fair & Alternative Trade (CFAT), and Elizabeth Bennett, CFAT Associate, provides a synthetic overview and guide to cutting edge research, theory, and debates. The first of its kind, this volume brings together 43 of the world’s foremost fair trade scholars from across the social sciences and around the world. The Handbook serves as both a comprehensive overview and in-depth guide to dominant perspectives and concerns. Chapters analyze the rapidly growing fair trade movement and market, exploring diverse initiatives and organizations, production and consumption regions, and food and cultural products. Written for those new to fair trade as well as those well versed in this domain, the Handbook is an invaluable resource for scholars and practitioners interested in global regulation, multi-stakeholder initiatives, social and environmental certification, ethical labeling, consumer activism and international development.

  • Greg Dickinson

    2015

    Suburban Dreams: Imagining and Building the Good Life

    CommunicationsRhetoricUrban Studies Publications

    Starting with the premise that suburban films, residential neighborhoods, chain restaurants, malls, and megachurches are compelling forms (topos) that shape and materialize the everyday lives of residents and visitors, Greg Dickinson’s Suburban Dreams offers a rhetorically attuned critical analysis of contemporary American suburbs and the “good life” their residents pursue. Dickinson’s analysis suggests that the good life is rooted in memory and locality, both of which are foundations for creating a sense of safety central to the success of suburbs. His argument is situated first in a discussion of the intersections among buildings, cities, and the good life and the challenges to these relationships wrought by the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The argument then turns to rich, fully-embodied analyses of suburban films and a series of archetypal suburban landscapes to explore how memory, locality, and safety interact in constructing the suburban imaginary. Moving from the pastoralism of residential neighborhoods and chain restaurants like Olive Garden and Macaroni Grill, through the megachurch’s veneration of suburban malls to the mixed-use lifestyle center’s nostalgic invocation of urban downtowns, Dickinson complicates traditional understandings of the ways suburbs situate residents and visitors in time and place. The analysis suggests that the suburban good life is devoted to family. Framed by the discourses of consumer culture, the suburbs often privilege walls and roots to an expansive vision of worldliness. At the same time, developments such as farmers markets suggest a continued striving by suburbanites to form relationships in a richer, more organic fashion. Dickinson’s work eschews casually dismissive attitudes toward the suburbs and the pursuit of the good life. Rather, he succeeds in showing how by identifying the positive rhetorical resources the suburbs supply, it is in fact possible to engage with the suburbs intentionally, thoughtfully, and rigorously. Beyond an analysis of the suburban imaginary, Suburban Dreams demonstrates how a critical engagement with everyday places can enrich daily life. The book provides much of interest to students and scholars of rhetoric, communication studies, public memory, American studies, architecture, and urban planning.

  • Karrin Anderson

    2013

    Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture

    Gender and SexualityPoliticsRhetoric Publications

    What elements of American political and rhetorical culture block the imagining—and thus, the electing—of a woman as president? Examining both major-party and third-party campaigns by women, including the 2008 campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, the authors of Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture identify the factors that limit electoral possibilities for women. Pundits have been predicting women’s political ascendency for years. And yet, although the 2008 presidential campaign featured Hillary Clinton as an early frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination and Sarah Palin as the first female Republican vice-presidential nominee, no woman has yet held either of the top two offices. The reasons for this are complex and varied, but the authors assert that the question certainly encompasses more than the shortcomings of women candidates or the demands of the particular political moment. Instead, the authors identify a pernicious backlash against women presidential candidates—one that is expressed in both political and popular culture. In Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture, Kristina Horn Sheeler and Karrin Vasby Anderson provide a discussion of US presidentiality as a unique rhetorical role. Within that framework, they review women’s historical and contemporary presidential bids, placing special emphasis on the 2008 campaign. They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media, and political parody.